For the modern-day football fan, the experience is a wholly different affair than it was in the 1990s.

For Chester City fans the decade brought a period of exile in Macclesfield, a new home in the city, a promotion, a relegation and the arrival of a maverick American.

Legends such as Cyrille Regis and Stuart Rimmer graced the hallowed turf of the Deva Stadium and sides such as Fulham, Cardiff City, Swansea City and Wigan Athletic were all regular visitors.

Here are 15 things you might recall if you were a fan of the Blues in the 90s. Let us know if there are any we've missed.

The last game at Sealand Road

Action from Chester City v Rotherham United, the final game ever to be played at the old Sealand Road stadium
Action from Chester City v Rotherham United, the final game ever to be played at the old Sealand Road stadium

Chester's home since 1906, Sealand Road had seen many a famous clash before it closed its doors for the final time, with a 2-0 win against Rotherham United the last time the Blues would play a Football League fixture there.

What was once the scene of League Cup heroics and players forever etched into Blues folklore is now a B&M Bargains.

The Deva Stadium being built

The Deva Stadium under construction
The Deva Stadium under construction

After leaving the Old Girl behind on April 28 1990, the Blues were forced into exile at Macclesfield Town's Moss Rose ground for two years.

The Blues moved into their £3m Deva Stadium home in 1992, with the ground the first in the country to comply with recommendations put forward by the Taylor Report in the wake of the Hillsborough disaster of 1989.

Granada Goals Extra

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Long before you could watch the goals back on your smartphone and get live updates via Twitter, getting home after the match on Saturday tea-time was something to be savoured.

Elton Welsby would be on hand to present all the action from the Football League, although the wait for Division Three to come around used to be a frustrating one.

Getting the bus to the ground

You used to be able to catch the bus to the ground from Chester Bus Station
You used to be able to catch the bus to the ground from Chester Bus Station

You'd be able to grab a bite to eat and drink in the city and then hot foot it over to the Chester Bus Exchange by the Town Hall and catch the double-decker with other Blues fans that would take you straight to the ground.

The service was abandoned in the early 2000s meaning there was now no way to avoid the long walk down Bumpers Lane and the plethora of builders merchants and tile warehouses.

When MFM used to leave you in suspense

'It's a GOAL!', the pre-recorded announcent used to shriek from the tape-deck of your car or your bulky hi-fi. But a goal for who?

MFM used to cover both the Blues and Wrexham and the announcement of a goal would be be followed by an anxious wait for news from the ground. It was agony for away games.

The long wait for Friday

Former Chronicle Blues reporter Ian Bedford
Former Chronicle Blues reporter Ian Bedford

Long before filing a 1,000 word online match report 10 seconds after the final whistle was commonplace, it would be a long wait to read the analysis of the Chester Chronicle's Blues reporter Ian Bedford and the thoughts of the manager post game.

Some things haven't altered, though

Neil Turner is still a familiar face at the Blues
Neil Turner is still a familiar face at the Blues

The voice of BBC Radio Merseyside's Neil Turner has become synonymous with the Blues over the years.

Having covered Chester since, in his own words, "1900 and frozen to death", Neil can still be found delivering his quips on the radio.

The Football League Panini sticker book

Jason Burnham and Iain Jenkins in the 1995 Football League sticker book
Jason Burnham and Iain Jenkins in the 1995 Football League sticker book

This was an actual thing that existed, and one that would provide great excitement for young Blues fans who had no interest in the world of the Premier League sticker books and their Anders Limpar shinys.

Not all newsagents stocked the stickers but those who would not be denied the chance to complete their Chester collection would be able to order packs from the back of magazines such as Match, Shoot! and Soccer Stars.

A legend in the blue and white

Stuart Rimmer in action for Chester against Wrexham
Stuart Rimmer in action for Chester against Wrexham

The word 'legend' can be overused but in the case of Stuart Rimmer it is fully justified.

Rimmer netted the last of his club-record 135 Football League goals for Chester in his final appearance for the Blues on May 2, 1998. Few players in the history of the club have been held in such high regard.

The good, the bad and the downright ugly

Chester City's 1994-95 shirt
Chester City's 1994-95 shirt

The 1990s aren't likely to go down in history as the golden age of football kits and Chester had their share of horrors.

While the promotion-winning shirt of 1993/94 was a clean, crisp classic, the following season dished up a real thumbs down. They ended the decade with the not-so-classic Kwik Save yellow away kit. A low point.

The arrival of Terry Smith

Terry Smith arrives at Chester City in 1999
Terry Smith arrives at Chester City in 1999

When American Smith arrived in 1999 he was seen as a knight in shining armour, saving the club from likely extinction. The reality was very different.

Three captains, a play-book and making himself manager all made for a pretty miserable campaign for Chester fans, one which resulted in them losing their Football League status at the end of the 1999/2000 season.

Perfect Ten

US girl band Perfect Ten performed before the League Cup clash with Aston Villa in 1999
US girl band Perfect Ten performed before the League Cup clash with Aston Villa in 1999

One of Terry Smith's marketing ideas, it turned out that five-piece US girl band, described by then commercial manager Dan Brooks as a cross between The Corrs and The Verve, weren't destined for stardom and that they weren't the ideal warm-up act for a Tuesday night Worthington Cup fixture against Aston Villa.

The Kansas group performed a medley of songs before the Villa game in September 1999, much to the bemusement and amusement of Blues fans.

Dr Death giving the safety announcement at the Deva Stadium

Welcome to the Deva Stadium.....
Welcome to the Deva Stadium.....

"Welcome to the Deva Stadium, home of Chester City. I have been asked to draw your attention......" You get the picture.

The monotone announcement was a regular feature since the club's arrival at the Deva Stadium, much to the delight of away fans. Thankfully, it was replaced by the more jovial tones of Charlie Lambert when the club reformed in 2010.

Before the designer beard, the moustache reigned supreme

Dave Felgate in his Chester City days
Dave Felgate in his Chester City days

Joe Jakub, Graham Barrow, Graham Abel and David Felgate were all fans of the moustache and championed them into the 1990s. Not forgetting the late great Harry McNally.

The halcyon days when footballers wore black boots, and ankle tape and Under Armour weren't deemed necessary accessories.

The shirt sponsors

Chester's Andy Crosby in the 1998/99 Saunders Honda-sponsored kit
Chester's Andy Crosby in the 1998/99 Saunders Honda-sponsored kit

While the 2000s saw numerous shirt sponsors come and go, the 90s had a more familiar feel to it. Corbett Bookmakers and Saunders Honda had strong associations with the Blues during the decade, although both had their name on the front of some 'interesting' designs at one time or another.